Sol LeWitt's early systems drawings encapsulated the idea that concepts, ideas and their subsequent processes can stand alone as art objects. This draft for 'Location of Lines' was presented in his 1974 exhibition at Lisson, in which the original publication from 1970 was presented and dispersed in single pages on the gallery walls.

Nicholas Logsdail's remembers the artist: "Sol LeWitt had a pivotal role for Lisson Gallery, especially in the early days. He and I worked intensively together embarking on projects, exhibitions at the gallery and the production of work. I also assisted Sol in building his extraordinary collection of living artists. He was exemplary as an artist in terms of his attitude, his openness, generosity and fair-handedness. His spirit lives on with us, and is deeply embedded in the culture of the gallery."

Lucy R. Lippard writing on the significance of LeWitt's drawings commented: "While LeWitt does not discover by making – the traditional artist’s method – he still discovers by doing. All of his ideas, he emphasises, are two-dimensional in origin. With his pen and notebooks he enjoys ‘drawing out’ the evolution of simple ideas, which perhaps explains how his work has maintained its vitality year after year, unlike that of many of his contemporaries. Between the generative concept and the visible result lies the tension of synthesis – the relationship between the apparent inertia of the objects produced and the boundless creative energy that produces them, and energy transmitted not by the artist personally as self-expression, but by the concept, or medium, the artist has chosen."